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Forest Legacy

Anderson County

Angelina County

  • Angelina & Neches River Railroad: Texas Historical Marker
  • Angelina County Lumber Company: Texas Historical Marker
  • City of Huntington: Texas Historical Marker
  • City of Lufkin: Texas Historical Marker
  • Collins-Shotwell House: Texas Historical Marker
  • East Texas Early Logging Equipment: Texas Historical Marker
  • Emporia: Texas Historical Marker
  • Ewing: Texas Historical Marker
  • Gibbs House: Texas State Historical Marker
  • Homer Cemetery: Texas Historical Marker
  • Hoo Hoo Band: Texas Historical Marker
  • Hoshall Switch: Texas Historical Marker
  • Kurth Home
  • Lindsey Springs Logging Camp: Texas Historical Marker
  • Lufkin Civilian Conservation Corp Camp: Texas Historical Marker
  • Lufkin Foundry and Machine Company: Texas Historical Marker
  • Machinery from Early East Texas Logging Railroad: Texas Historical Marker
  • Mt Calvary Baptist Church: Texas Historical Marker
  • Old Diboll Library: Texas Historical Marker
  • Site of Manning: Texas Historical Marker
  • Site of Martin Wagon Company: Texas Historical Marker
  • Southern Pine Lumber Company Commissary: Texas Historical Marker
  • Southern Pine Lumber Company Sawmill
  • Southland Paper Mills, Inc: Texas Historical Marker
  • Stranger's Rest Cemetery: Texas Historical Marker
  • Texas Forest Service
  • TLL Temple: Texas Historical Marker
  • Urban Wildscape Trail @ The Texas Forestry Museum
  • Bowie County

    Camp County

    Cass County

    Cherokee County

    Franklin County

    Gregg County

    Hardin County

    Harrison County

    Henderson County

    Houston County

    Jasper County

    Jefferson County

    Liberty County

    Marion County

    Montgomery County

    Morris County

    Nacogdoches County

    Newton County

    Orange County

  • Alexander Gilmer: Texas Historical Marker
  • Charles Holmes Saxon: Texas Historical Marker
  • City of Orange: Texas Historical Marker
  • David Robert Wingate: Texas Historical Marker
  • First National Bank of Orange: Texas Historical Marker
  • Henry Jacob Lutcher: Texas Historical Marker
  • Homesite of Dr. Edgar William Brown: Historical Marker
  • John Thomas Stark: Texas Historical Marker
  • Lutcher & Moore Lumber Company: Texas Historical Marker
  • Lutcher Memorial Church Building: Texas Historical Marker
  • Neyland-Gilmer House: Texas Historical Marker
  • Orange County: Texas Historical Marker
  • Robert B. Russell: Texas Historical Marker
  • Site of End of the Line Station: Texas Historical Marker
  • Site of World War II P.O.W.Camp: Texas Historical Marker
  • The Heritage House Museum of Orange County
  • The Sawmill Industry in Orange County: Texas Historical Marker
  • The W.H. Stark House: Texas Historical Marker
  • Panola County

    Polk County

    Red River County

    Shelby County

    West Fork of the San Jacinto River: Texas Historical Marker

    Montgomery

    Conroe

    West Fork of the San Jacinto River: Texas Historical Marker
    Patiri and other Indians lived here in Archaic and Neo-American periods. When Spanish incursions began in the 1700s, the river was named either for hyacinths or for the saint on whose day it was discovered. Pioneers from the United States settled on the San Jacinto before Stephen F. Austin founded his colony to the west in 1821. Upon their wish to join him, he took this area into his colony in 1824. The San Jacinto won world fame when, beside its lower channel, Mexican Dictator Santa Anna with 1700 troops was defeated on April 21, 1836, by General Sam Houston and Texas volunteers fighting for freedom. Riverside farms became plantations, often shipping cotton by keelboat down the San Jacinto in 1845-61. Until woodlands vanished during the years 1880-1930, sandhill cranes and bear abounded. Reforestation, begun in 1936, brought back timber industries and small game. The lake now makes this a residential and recreational paradise, but covers such landmarks as Grandma Ed'Ards fishing hole, Indian Camp Creek, and the White Sugar Sand Crossing. Downriver, after this fork and the East Fork unite, the San Jacinto forms part of the Houston Ship Channel, the link between Port of Houston, the Gulf, and the high seas.