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Forest Legacy

Anderson County

Angelina County

  • Angelina & Neches River Railroad: Texas Historical Marker
  • Angelina County Lumber Company: Texas Historical Marker
  • City of Huntington: Texas Historical Marker
  • City of Lufkin: Texas Historical Marker
  • Collins-Shotwell House: Texas Historical Marker
  • East Texas Early Logging Equipment: Texas Historical Marker
  • Emporia: Texas Historical Marker
  • Ewing: Texas Historical Marker
  • Gibbs House: Texas State Historical Marker
  • Homer Cemetery: Texas Historical Marker
  • Hoo Hoo Band: Texas Historical Marker
  • Hoshall Switch: Texas Historical Marker
  • Kurth Home
  • Lindsey Springs Logging Camp: Texas Historical Marker
  • Lufkin Civilian Conservation Corp Camp: Texas Historical Marker
  • Lufkin Foundry and Machine Company: Texas Historical Marker
  • Machinery from Early East Texas Logging Railroad: Texas Historical Marker
  • Mt Calvary Baptist Church: Texas Historical Marker
  • Old Diboll Library: Texas Historical Marker
  • Site of Manning: Texas Historical Marker
  • Site of Martin Wagon Company: Texas Historical Marker
  • Southern Pine Lumber Company Commissary: Texas Historical Marker
  • Southern Pine Lumber Company Sawmill
  • Southland Paper Mills, Inc: Texas Historical Marker
  • Stranger's Rest Cemetery: Texas Historical Marker
  • Texas Forest Service
  • TLL Temple: Texas Historical Marker
  • Urban Wildscape Trail @ The Texas Forestry Museum
  • Bowie County

    Camp County

    Cass County

    Cherokee County

    Franklin County

    Gregg County

    Hardin County

    Harrison County

    Henderson County

    Houston County

    Jasper County

    Jefferson County

    Liberty County

    Marion County

    Montgomery County

    Morris County

    Nacogdoches County

    Newton County

    Orange County

  • Alexander Gilmer: Texas Historical Marker
  • Charles Holmes Saxon: Texas Historical Marker
  • City of Orange: Texas Historical Marker
  • David Robert Wingate: Texas Historical Marker
  • First National Bank of Orange: Texas Historical Marker
  • Henry Jacob Lutcher: Texas Historical Marker
  • Homesite of Dr. Edgar William Brown: Historical Marker
  • John Thomas Stark: Texas Historical Marker
  • Lutcher & Moore Lumber Company: Texas Historical Marker
  • Lutcher Memorial Church Building: Texas Historical Marker
  • Neyland-Gilmer House: Texas Historical Marker
  • Orange County: Texas Historical Marker
  • Robert B. Russell: Texas Historical Marker
  • Site of End of the Line Station: Texas Historical Marker
  • Site of World War II P.O.W.Camp: Texas Historical Marker
  • The Heritage House Museum of Orange County
  • The Sawmill Industry in Orange County: Texas Historical Marker
  • The W.H. Stark House: Texas Historical Marker
  • Panola County

    Polk County

    Red River County

    Shelby County

    City of Conroe: Texas Historical Marker

    Montgomery

    Conroe

    City of Conroe: Texas Historical Marker
    In 1881, Houston lumberman Isaac Conroe established a sawmill on Stewart's Creek two miles east of the International Great Northern Railroad's Houston-Crockett line on a tract of land in the J. Smith survey, first settled in the late 1830's. A small tram line connected the mill to the track, but Conroe soon transferred his operations down the tracks to the rail junction, where his new mill became a station on the I-GN. In January 1884, a post office was established at the mill commissary, and, at the suggestion of railroad official H.M. Hoxey, the community took the name Conroe's Switch within a decade the name was shortened to Conroe.In the mid 1880's the Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railway extended its Navasota Montgomery spur eastward through the town, which thus became the only junction of major rail lines in the county. A lumber boom beginning in the late nineteenth century in the Piney Woods of eastern and central Montgomery County attracted scores of settlers to Conroe. In 1889, Conroe replaced Montgomery as the county seat. By 1892 the community had become a shipping center for lumber, cotton, livestock and bricks. It had five steam-powered saw and planing mills, several brickyards, a cotton gin, a gristmill, and several hotels and general stores.The prosperity of the local agriculture and timber industries in the early twentieth century enabled Conroe to continue its rapid early growth despite severe fires in 1901 and 1911, which destroyed much of the business district near the courthouse square. After a few years of sustained growth, the town's prosperity was threatened in the late 1920's by the dwindling of the improperly managed local timber supply. Then in 1930 the spreading effects of the Great Depression struck Montgomery County, drastically curtailing lumber production and forcing many mills to close. In November 1930, Conroe's only bank abruptly failed and pushed many residents and institutions into financial doldrums for many years. However in 1931 oil was discovered just outside of town and Conroe's future success the centered on chemical and oil production.