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Forest Legacy

Anderson County

Angelina County

  • Angelina & Neches River Railroad: Texas Historical Marker
  • Angelina County Lumber Company: Texas Historical Marker
  • City of Huntington: Texas Historical Marker
  • City of Lufkin: Texas Historical Marker
  • Collins-Shotwell House: Texas Historical Marker
  • East Texas Early Logging Equipment: Texas Historical Marker
  • Emporia: Texas Historical Marker
  • Ewing: Texas Historical Marker
  • Gibbs House: Texas State Historical Marker
  • Homer Cemetery: Texas Historical Marker
  • Hoo Hoo Band: Texas Historical Marker
  • Hoshall Switch: Texas Historical Marker
  • Kurth Home
  • Lindsey Springs Logging Camp: Texas Historical Marker
  • Lufkin Civilian Conservation Corp Camp: Texas Historical Marker
  • Lufkin Foundry and Machine Company: Texas Historical Marker
  • Machinery from Early East Texas Logging Railroad: Texas Historical Marker
  • Mt Calvary Baptist Church: Texas Historical Marker
  • Old Diboll Library: Texas Historical Marker
  • Site of Manning: Texas Historical Marker
  • Site of Martin Wagon Company: Texas Historical Marker
  • Southern Pine Lumber Company Commissary: Texas Historical Marker
  • Southern Pine Lumber Company Sawmill
  • Southland Paper Mills, Inc: Texas Historical Marker
  • Stranger's Rest Cemetery: Texas Historical Marker
  • Texas Forest Service
  • TLL Temple: Texas Historical Marker
  • Urban Wildscape Trail @ The Texas Forestry Museum
  • Bowie County

    Camp County

    Cass County

    Cherokee County

    Franklin County

    Gregg County

    Hardin County

    Harrison County

    Henderson County

    Houston County

    Jasper County

    Jefferson County

    Liberty County

    Marion County

    Montgomery County

    Morris County

    Nacogdoches County

    Newton County

    Orange County

  • Alexander Gilmer: Texas Historical Marker
  • Charles Holmes Saxon: Texas Historical Marker
  • City of Orange: Texas Historical Marker
  • David Robert Wingate: Texas Historical Marker
  • First National Bank of Orange: Texas Historical Marker
  • Henry Jacob Lutcher: Texas Historical Marker
  • Homesite of Dr. Edgar William Brown: Historical Marker
  • John Thomas Stark: Texas Historical Marker
  • Lutcher & Moore Lumber Company: Texas Historical Marker
  • Lutcher Memorial Church Building: Texas Historical Marker
  • Neyland-Gilmer House: Texas Historical Marker
  • Orange County: Texas Historical Marker
  • Robert B. Russell: Texas Historical Marker
  • Site of End of the Line Station: Texas Historical Marker
  • Site of World War II P.O.W.Camp: Texas Historical Marker
  • The Heritage House Museum of Orange County
  • The Sawmill Industry in Orange County: Texas Historical Marker
  • The W.H. Stark House: Texas Historical Marker
  • Panola County

    Polk County

    Red River County

    Shelby County

    Willis

    Montgomery

    Willis

    Willis
    Willis, a lumbering and agricultural market town, is on the Missouri Pacific Railroad eight miles north of Conroe in north central Montgomery County. In 1870, as the Houston and Great Northern Railroad began surveying Montgomery County's first rail line, Galveston merchants Peter J. and Richard S. Willis, landholders in Montgomery County, donated a town site to the railroad along the proposed route. By 1884, in addition to its various schools and churches, Willis boasted several steam-powered saw and grist mills, two cotton gins, a brickyard, a saloon and gambling house, a Grange hall, numerous grocery and dry-goods stores, and a population of 600. During the late nineteenth century the Willis area became the leading tobacco growing region in the state; before the lifting of the tariff on Cuban tobacco killed the boom in the early twentieth century, Willis supported as many as seven cigar factories. As tobacco culture declined, a boom in the production of timber and agricultural products kept the town's economy thriving. The town's growth came to a temporary halt, however, with the onset of the Great Depression and the resulting slump in local timber production. From an estimated 900 in 1929, population fell to an estimated 750 by 1931. But an oil boom in central Montgomery County that began southeast of Conroe in 1931 soon spread its effects to the Willis area, bringing renewed economic activity and an influx of population. Then, during World War II, the lumber industry and agricultural activity revived. By the 1980's the Willis area was at last benefiting from the spillover effects of the postwar booms of Houston and Conroe, but the economy remained based on lumbering and agriculture.Above Information found in Handbook of Texas Online, s.v. "WILLIS, TX," http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/WW/hjw12.html (accessed June 17, 2005). Marker located at SH 75 and Fm 2432.